Lay Ecclesial Minister Certification: Self-Assessment Form

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Self-Assessment Relative to the National Certification Standards: 




Introduction

This self-assessment is based upon the National Certification Standards for Lay Ecclesial Ministers and is designed to assist candidates for certification to assess their competence relative to those standards and their respective competencies, including the specialized competencies of a given ministry specialization. Submission of a completed self-assessment is a requirement for certification.

This self-assessment is comprehensive and detailed and will take some time to complete. Candidates are encouraged to give it the time it demands. Once completed, it will highlight strengths as well as areas in need of further attention. 

The format of the self-assessment is as follows:

There are five sections, four of which are devoted to each of the four standards from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops statement on Lay Ecclesial Ministry, Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord (human, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral) and a fifth devoted to specialized competencies related to your specific area of ministry.

Instructions
  1. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: Evidence may include formal education such as courses, training, workshops, practicums, projects, internships, etc., along with examples from your history of ministry in which the particular competency was demonstrated. 

  2. Rating: Use the following scale to rate yourself relative to that competency statement.

3 / Strong Competence: There is significant evidence of education and experience that substantiates strong competence.

2 / Adequate Competence: There is moderate evidence of education and experience that substantiates adequate competence.

1 / Needs Work: There is little or no evidence of education and/or experience.

Section One / Standard One: Human


  Rating: Use the following scale to rate yourself relative to that competency statement.

3 / Strong Competence: There is significant evidence of education and experience that substantiates strong competence.

2 / Adequate Competence: There is moderate evidence of education and experience that substantiates adequate competence.

1 / Needs Work: There is little or no evidence of education and/or experience.

1.0 Standard One
Lay ecclesial ministers demonstrate the qualities of human maturity needed for fruitful ministry with the people of God.

Vision Statement
Lay ecclesial ministers, as all ecclesial ministers, develop their human character and relational abilities so that they can be “a bridge and not an obstacle” for people in their encounter with Jesus Christ.* This development entails the twofold dynamic of strengthening positive traits that foster ministerial effectiveness and lessening negative traits that hinder it. Accordingly, lay ecclesial ministers strive to deepen their knowledge of self and others, grow from experiences of suffering and challenge, maintain a balanced lifestyle and positive relationships, appreciate and value diversity, and demonstrate basic human virtues. Cultivating such traits and skills within a Christ-centered community contributes to the development of “a healthy and well-balanced personality, for the sake of both personal growth and ministerial service” (Co-Workers, p. 36).

* Pope John Paul II, Pastores Dabo Vobis: I Will Give You Shepherds (1992), 43.

Core Competencies
A lay ecclesial minister will:


a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 




Section Two / Standard Two: Spiritual


  Rating: Use the following scale to rate yourself relative to that competency statement.

3 / Strong Competence: There is significant evidence of education and experience that substantiates strong competence.

2 / Adequate Competence: There is moderate evidence of education and experience that substantiates adequate competence.

1 / Needs Work: There is little or no evidence of education and/or experience.

2.0 Standard Two
Sharing in the common priesthood of all the baptized, a lay ecclesial minister demonstrates Christian spirituality as foundational to ministry, integrated in service with the people of God, and possessing a sacramental view of the world that recognizes the world can be a vessel of God’s presence and God’s transforming grace.

Vision Statement
Having encountered the person and message of Jesus Christ, the hunger of the lay ecclesial minister for union with the Triune God is constant. The result of this hunger is the call to holiness built on the Word of God, experienced in the liturgy and sacraments, formed through suffering, nurtured in joy, and sustained in community with all the baptized and through the Church as Mystical Body. The minister gives witness to a well-formed spirituality through a rich and diversified prayer life, theological reflection, and action rooted in Catholic social teaching. Spiritual formation is grounded in the understanding that “if ministry does not flow from a personal encounter and ongoing relationship with the Lord, then no matter how ‘accomplished’ it may be in its methods and activities, that ministry will lack the vital soul and source needed to bear lasting fruit” (Co-Workers, p.38). Therefore, open to the mystery of God’s love and in touch with the world’s realities, all actions of the lay ecclesial minister flow from “that fundamental conversion that places God, and not oneself, at the center of one’s life” (Co-Workers, p. 38).

Core Competencies
A lay ecclesial minister will:


a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 




Section Three / Standard Three: Intellectual


  Rating: Use the following scale to rate yourself relative to that competency statement.

3 / Strong Competence: There is significant evidence of education and experience that substantiates strong competence.

2 / Adequate Competence: There is moderate evidence of education and experience that substantiates adequate competence.

1 / Needs Work: There is little or no evidence of education and/or experience.

3.0 Standard Three
A lay ecclesial minister demonstrates understanding of the breadth of Catholic theological and pastoral studies as well as the intellectual skill to use that knowledge in ministry with God’s people from diverse populations and cultures.

Vision Statement
“Formation for lay ecclesial ministry is a journey beyond catechesis into theological study" (Co- Workers, p. 43). A lay ecclesial minister’s faith and ministry are formed by the study of the Catholic theological tradition focusing on the  following core elements: Scripture and its interpretation, dogmatic theology, Church history, liturgical and sacramental theology, moral theology and Catholic social teaching, pastoral theology, spirituality, canon law, ecumenism and interreligious dialogue, the social sciences, humanities, and culture and language studies. Based upon this study, a theologically competent minister can articulate and interpret this Catholic theological tradition with disciples from diverse communities. A key dynamic of effective lay ecclesial ministry is the integration into ministry practices of the key documents and principal theories of pastoral ministry.

Core Competencies
A lay ecclesial minister will:


a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 




Section Four / Standard Four: Pastoral


  Rating: Use the following scale to rate yourself relative to that competency statement.

3 / Strong Competence: There is significant evidence of education and experience that substantiates strong competence.

2 / Adequate Competence: There is moderate evidence of education and experience that substantiates adequate competence.

1 / Needs Work: There is little or no evidence of education and/or experience.

4.0 Standard Four
A lay ecclesial minister demonstrates a range of leadership and pastoral skills needed for functioning effectively in ministry.

Vision Statement
As a response to their baptismal call, lay ecclesial ministers accept the grace of leadership and
manifest a range of skills and pastoral gifts which allow them to function effectively in ministry. In their role as evangelizers, they operate in a parochial setting which has various dimensions—faith formation, worship, cultural diversity, community life, social justice, and apostolic service. They are effective listeners who foster respect and offer compassionate care within varied family, community, and cultural settings. In the spirit of the Gospel, they serve others as companions on the journey of faith. These ministers demonstrate good stewardship, work collaboratively with other lay and ordained ministers, and exhibit human resource and management skills. They have an ability to discern and nurture the gifts of all the baptized in order to build the Kingdom of God. Lastly, these ministers embrace a professional code of ethics worthy of Catholic ministry and abide by civil and Church law. “Pastoral formation cultivates the knowledge, attitudes, and skills that directly pertain to effective functioning in the ministry setting and that also pertain to pastoral administration that supports direct ministry” (Co-Workers, page 47).

Core Competencies
A lay ecclesial minister will:


a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 




Section Five / Specialized Competencies


  Rating: Use the following scale to rate yourself relative to that competency statement.

3 / Strong Competence: There is significant evidence of education and experience that substantiates strong competence.

2 / Adequate Competence: There is moderate evidence of education and experience that substantiates adequate competence.

1 / Needs Work: There is little or no evidence of education and/or experience.

Coordinator of Youth Ministry
A Coordinator of Youth Ministry will:
Demonstrate an understanding of the vision, goals, principles and components of Catholic youth ministry as outlined in the U.S. bishops’ in Renewing the Vision and related Church documents. 


a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 




 
Christian Service Coordinator
A Christian Service Coordinator:


a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 




Director of Music Ministries
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 




RCIA Coordinator
An RCIA Coordinator demonstrates complete knowledge and understanding of the RCIA Process, including the liturgical, pastoral, and catechetical aspects of each phase of the RCIA.  The RCIA Coordinator is responsible for coordinating the RCIA parish process, establishing and forming the RCIA Team in collaboration with the pastor, and ensuring the proper discernment of everyone involved in the RCIA Process.

An RCIA Coordinator will:


a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 




Parish Catechetical Leader/Director of Religious Education
 A parish catechetical leader will: 


a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: 
 

a. Evidence of Formal Education/Experience: