CDN REACH - Public Comment Submission Form 

In 2019, College Diabetes Network launched the CDN REACH initiative to engage campus leadership in holistically supporting students with diabetes. In April 2020, CDN REACH is convening the first meeting of our coalition of diabetes and higher education experts. Two issues have been identified for group discussion, and we are seeking your feedback:

  1. Given new therapies recently introduced to the market, create consensus regarding use of Emergency Glucagon treatment in cases of severe hypoglycemia on campus, and accommodations associated.
  2. Given new diabetes technology (e.g. CGMs and looping therapies) utilizing smartphones and other devices (e.g. watches and tablets), create consensus regarding authorized use of smart devices both in class and during exams, and accommodations associated.   
Over the years, many students, parents, clinicians, and campus administrators have shared with CDN their concerns about these two issues. Following our April meeting, it is our hope to publish consensus guidelines for university personnel on how to address these topics. 

We welcome your feedback as members of the diabetes and/or higher ed communities on these issues. Please use this form to submit comments on either or both issues by end of day on Monday, February 17th. 

CDN retains permission to use any comments submitted, in full or in part, in materials related to this initiative. If you would like your comments to remain anonymous, please indicate so at the bottom of this form.  



Issue 1 - Glucagon on Campus


Given
 new therapies recently introduced to the market, create consensus regarding use of Emergency Glucagon treatment in cases of severe hypoglycemia on campus, and accommodations associated.

Glucagon therapies available prior to 2019 presented barriers to widespread training on their use by campus personnel (such as professors, resident advisors, and campus police) because these therapies required manual preparation and injection. New therapies now available on the market come in ready-to-inject (similar to EpiPen) or intranasal (similar to Narcan) formats, which have the potential to mitigate these concerns.

For further reading on glucagon therapies, refer to this article from Healthline.


Issue 2 - Technology in the Classroom

Given new diabetes technology (e.g. CGMs and looping therapies) utilizing smartphones and other devices (e.g. watches and tablets), create consensus regarding authorized use of smart devices both in class and during exams, and accommodations associated.   

Professors frequently restrict the use of smartphones, watches, and tablets in classrooms due to concerns of cheating, particularly during exams. This can pose a problem for students who rely on applications that allow them to access diabetes data from CGMs and other devices.


Additional Comments


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