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Lifelong learning is at the core of Beth Emet values. Beth Emet is a diverse community of individuals with different viewpoints, backgrounds, and a broad range of Jewish learning experiences. The Beth Emet Adult Education Program offers exciting possibilities for meeting new people, exchanging ideas, and embracing Jewish history, ritual, and culture. Our classes are taught by experienced teachers and lay leaders from Beth Emet and the larger Jewish community. Offerings range from one-time events to yearlong classes.


Classes are listed and described chronologically. Everyone is welcome to listen, learn, contribute, and share new insights with other members of the Beth Emet community. Helene Rosenberg, Adult Education Committee Chair
Barbara Berngard, Reva Denlow, Nancy Fink, Douglas Hoffman, Barbara Linn, Jesse Rosenberg, and Barbara Schoenfield, Committee Member


Member Contact Information








Non-Member Contact Information








Courses
Please choose class(es) below.  You can hover over any class name to see a full description.
Friday Morning Package
Member Special: Save when you sign up for all of the classes listed below. These classes are on Fridays beginning at 11:00 a.m. and end at 12:15 p.m. Member fee: $110
Does Charity Save from Death: What Do We Think We Are Doing When We Right Checks? With Rabbi Michael Balinsky
Friday, October 8 and 15

Social and Cultural Contracts Between Jews and Arabs with Dr. Maayan Hilel
Friday, October 22 and 29

Rabbinic Inferno: Hell in Classical Judaism with Dr. Dov Weiss
Fridays, November 5 and 12

The Mishnah: Law as Literature with Barry Wimpfheimer
Fridays, January 21 and 28

Religion and Literature with Claire Sufrin
Fridays, February 18 and 25
Courses

There are many ways to interpret Torah and its nuances of meaning that are often overlooked. We will continue our learning from last year, reading and interpreting the text of the Book of Deuteronomy line by line. New learners are always welcome.
When we write checks or engage in other actions to directly help the poor are we really helping them, or do we want to look good in God’s eyes and our own? We will study some rabbinic passages to see how rabbis in Israel differed on the topic from their Babylonian colleagues.
An automobile accident and its aftermath set a young girl on a twenty-year journey that resulted in her recently published memoir, Seven Springs (Shanti Arts). Join Ellen as she reads excerpts from her memoir on themes of study, brokenness, and repair; and facilitates discussion about healing, writing, and faith.
Participants study as a small group to become kabbalat mitzvah together at Beth Emet. Please contact Marci Dickman, Director of Lifelong Education, for additional information.
Hand in Hand builds partnership and equality between Jewish and Arab Israeli citizens through a growing network of integrated Jewish-Arab schools and communities throughout the country. It impacts over 10,000 people every day, including 2,000 students in seven public schools from Jerusalem to the Galilee. The panel includes moderator Noa Yammer, International Engagement and Communication leader at Hand in Hand, and panelists representing program alumni from Palestinian and Jewish Israel.
As uncertain and unsettling as these times may be, they are not unprecedented — we have encountered them before and we prevailed. Conversation on the significance of faith communities in American public life during these troubling times will be moderated by our own Rabbi Andrea London and Reverend David J. Wood, Senior Minister at Glencoe Union Church.
Explore your spirituality or connection to the mystery or the divine in the world. We will use the prayerbook, poetry, and ourselves as our texts, aiming to deepen our connections and discern meaningful paths in our daily lives. Our tools will include mindfulness practices, journaling, questioning, and conversation. Doubting God’s existence? Come explore.
Elan and Naamah will reflect on their shared life journeys as an Israeli and an American who met 45 years ago: what Israel and American Jewry were like when they met; how each saw the other then; changes over the decades; their respective roles and activities; and the progress and collaboration of Conservative and Reform Judaism in Israel on issues of mutual concern. Two breakout sessions follow. Naamah will discuss the renaissance and challenges of Jewish life in Israel through her work as a rabbi and the dean of Hebrew Union College. Elan will focus on issues of Jewish peoplehood, Israel-Diaspora relations, and his work teaching Israelis about American Jewry.
Elan and Naamah will reflect on their shared life journeys as an Israeli and an American who met 45 years ago: what Israel and American Jewry were like when they met; how each saw the other then; changes over the decades; their respective roles and activities; and the progress and collaboration of Conservative and Reform Judaism in Israel on issues of mutual concern. Two breakout sessions follow. Naamah will discuss the renaissance and challenges of Jewish life in Israel through her work as a rabbi and the dean of Hebrew Union College. Elan will focus on issues of Jewish peoplehood, Israel-Diaspora relations, and his work teaching Israelis about American Jewry.
Learn about the origins and development of Jewish communities in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic as compared to other Caribbean Jewish populations. Learn about the Jewish settlement in Sosúa, Dominican Republic from fictional and archival materials of the original settlers, their descendants, and from historians.
In argument against the American Reform Jewish stance of the 1885 Pittsburgh Platform that Gehenna (Hell) is an idea that is not rooted in Judaism, we will examine ancient Jewish discourse about Gehenna to unearth the distinctive values, aesthetics, fantasies, and hopes found within classical Jewish culture.
This organization of Israelis and Palestinians — with active members in the U.S. and Europe — seeks a truly negotiated resolution of the Conflict for a just and lasting peace for Israel and Palestine within their own communities; it provides programs to reduce hate, polarization, and racism. We will hear about issues for a two-state solution and growing up in Gaza.
A continuing lecture-discussion class on contemporary public issues of interest to Jews as citizens. Special attention will be given to the policy and political issues facing the Biden administration.
Current policy and political decisions are often influenced by events from earlier historical periods. We will explore the conflict between morality and self-interest as the basis for American foreign policy from the 1820s to American entry in World War I, with comments about the 2021 U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.
A briefing by an Israeli diplomat to give us clarity about positions of the Israeli government, and, for most of the session, an opportunity to ask questions and provide information to Israel about our concerns.
The Center that Rabbi Resnicoff directs includes as a focus combatting the scourge of antisemitism — Jewish college faculty and students too often face intimidation and harassment for being pro-Israel or sometimes just for being Jewish. This program will examine the challenges faced and available resources.
A continuing lecture-discussion class on contemporary public issues of interest to Jews as citizens. Special attention will be given to the policy and political issues facing the Biden administration.
There is more to the Mishnah than meets the eye. We will discuss how it complicates our understanding of the nature of law and asks us to examine our expectations when reading what we consider to be good literature. This class is dedicated to the memory of Dan Cedarbaum, z”l.
An in-depth look at some of the debacles during the Jewish people’s trek through the desert, including the stories of the Golden Calf, the Spies, and the Korach Mutiny. We will look at the narratives, text, philosophical issues, what they might say to us today, and compare to the way they were presented in the movie, The Ten Commandments.
Panelists from three major organizations — J Street, Partners for Progressive Israel, and AIPAC — will discuss significant current events in Israel.
with Yossi Kuperwasser, a director of the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center and a Brigadier General in the IDF Reserves.
We will explore different aspects of the relationship between religion and literature in contemporary novels and poetry, including rewritings of biblical stories, portrayals of religious life, and characters wrestling with religious ideas and values. Most examples will be focused on Judaism and Jews, though some may be drawn from other faith traditions.
For learners with no or limited Hebrew language background. Master the Hebrew alphabet to read and understand Hebrew words and phrases in the prayer book and modern usage; connect Hebrew language with Jewish life, ritual, tradition, and Israel. Individual tutoring also available — please contact Marci Dickman, Director of Lifelong Education.
For learners seeking more meaningful participation at services. Improve Hebrew reading fluency while exploring the Shabbat morning worship service and its individual prayers. Learn key Hebrew prayer vocabulary and basic elements of Hebrew grammar.
For learners able to sound out and print Hebrew words. Explore the grammar and vocabulary of modern Hebrew through a variety of reading, writing, and speaking activities.
Courses

There are many ways to interpret Torah and its nuances of meaning that are often overlooked. We will continue our learning from last year, reading and interpreting the text of the Book of Deuteronomy line by line. New learners are always welcome.
When we write checks or engage in other actions to directly help the poor are we really helping them, or do we want to look good in God’s eyes and our own? We will study some rabbinic passages to see how rabbis in Israel differed on the topic from their Babylonian colleagues.
An automobile accident and its aftermath set a young girl on a twenty-year journey that resulted in her recently published memoir, Seven Springs (Shanti Arts). Join Ellen as she reads excerpts from her memoir on themes of study, brokenness, and repair; and facilitates discussion about healing, writing, and faith.
Participants study as a small group to become kabbalat mitzvah together at Beth Emet. Please contact Marci Dickman, Director of Lifelong Education, for additional information.
Hand in Hand builds partnership and equality between Jewish and Arab Israeli citizens through a growing network of integrated Jewish-Arab schools and communities throughout the country. It impacts over 10,000 people every day, including 2,000 students in seven public schools from Jerusalem to the Galilee. The panel includes moderator Noa Yammer, International Engagement and Communication leader at Hand in Hand, and panelists representing program alumni from Palestinian and Jewish Israel.
As uncertain and unsettling as these times may be, they are not unprecedented — we have encountered them before and we prevailed. Conversation on the significance of faith communities in American public life during these troubling times will be moderated by our own Rabbi Andrea London and Reverend David J. Wood, Senior Minister at Glencoe Union Church.
Explore your spirituality or connection to the mystery or the divine in the world. We will use the prayerbook, poetry, and ourselves as our texts, aiming to deepen our connections and discern meaningful paths in our daily lives. Our tools will include mindfulness practices, journaling, questioning, and conversation. Doubting God’s existence? Come explore.
Elan and Naamah will reflect on their shared life journeys as an Israeli and an American who met 45 years ago: what Israel and American Jewry were like when they met; how each saw the other then; changes over the decades; their respective roles and activities; and the progress and collaboration of Conservative and Reform Judaism in Israel on issues of mutual concern. Two breakout sessions follow. Naamah will discuss the renaissance and challenges of Jewish life in Israel through her work as a rabbi and the dean of Hebrew Union College. Elan will focus on issues of Jewish peoplehood, Israel-Diaspora relations, and his work teaching Israelis about American Jewry.
Elan and Naamah will reflect on their shared life journeys as an Israeli and an American who met 45 years ago: what Israel and American Jewry were like when they met; how each saw the other then; changes over the decades; their respective roles and activities; and the progress and collaboration of Conservative and Reform Judaism in Israel on issues of mutual concern. Two breakout sessions follow. Naamah will discuss the renaissance and challenges of Jewish life in Israel through her work as a rabbi and the dean of Hebrew Union College. Elan will focus on issues of Jewish peoplehood, Israel-Diaspora relations, and his work teaching Israelis about American Jewry.
Learn about the origins and development of Jewish communities in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic as compared to other Caribbean Jewish populations. Learn about the Jewish settlement in Sosúa, Dominican Republic from fictional and archival materials of the original settlers, their descendants, and from historians.
In argument against the American Reform Jewish stance of the 1885 Pittsburgh Platform that Gehenna (Hell) is an idea that is not rooted in Judaism, we will examine ancient Jewish discourse about Gehenna to unearth the distinctive values, aesthetics, fantasies, and hopes found within classical Jewish culture.
This organization of Israelis and Palestinians — with active members in the U.S. and Europe — seeks a truly negotiated resolution of the Conflict for a just and lasting peace for Israel and Palestine within their own communities; it provides programs to reduce hate, polarization, and racism. We will hear about issues for a two-state solution and growing up in Gaza.
A continuing lecture-discussion class on contemporary public issues of interest to Jews as citizens. Special attention will be given to the policy and political issues facing the Biden administration.
Current policy and political decisions are often influenced by events from earlier historical periods. We will explore the conflict between morality and self-interest as the basis for American foreign policy from the 1820s to American entry in World War I, with comments about the 2021 U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.
A briefing by an Israeli diplomat to give us clarity about positions of the Israeli government, and, for most of the session, an opportunity to ask questions and provide information to Israel about our concerns.
The Center that Rabbi Resnicoff directs includes as a focus combatting the scourge of antisemitism — Jewish college faculty and students too often face intimidation and harassment for being pro-Israel or sometimes just for being Jewish. This program will examine the challenges faced and available resources.
A continuing lecture-discussion class on contemporary public issues of interest to Jews as citizens. Special attention will be given to the policy and political issues facing the Biden administration.
There is more to the Mishnah than meets the eye. We will discuss how it complicates our understanding of the nature of law and asks us to examine our expectations when reading what we consider to be good literature. This class is dedicated to the memory of Dan Cedarbaum, z”l.
An in-depth look at some of the debacles during the Jewish people’s trek through the desert, including the stories of the Golden Calf, the Spies, and the Korach Mutiny. We will look at the narratives, text, philosophical issues, what they might say to us today, and compare to the way they were presented in the movie, The Ten Commandments.
Panelists from three major organizations — J Street, Partners for Progressive Israel, and AIPAC — will discuss significant current events in Israel.
with Yossi Kuperwasser, a director of the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center and a Brigadier General in the IDF Reserves.
We will explore different aspects of the relationship between religion and literature in contemporary novels and poetry, including rewritings of biblical stories, portrayals of religious life, and characters wrestling with religious ideas and values. Most examples will be focused on Judaism and Jews, though some may be drawn from other faith traditions.
For learners with no or limited Hebrew language background. Master the Hebrew alphabet to read and understand Hebrew words and phrases in the prayer book and modern usage; connect Hebrew language with Jewish life, ritual, tradition, and Israel. Individual tutoring also available — please contact Marci Dickman, Director of Lifelong Education.
For learners seeking more meaningful participation at services. Improve Hebrew reading fluency while exploring the Shabbat morning worship service and its individual prayers. Learn key Hebrew prayer vocabulary and basic elements of Hebrew grammar.
For learners able to sound out and print Hebrew words. Explore the grammar and vocabulary of modern Hebrew through a variety of reading, writing, and speaking activities.
Courses

There are many ways to interpret Torah and its nuances of meaning that are often overlooked. We will continue our learning from last year, reading and interpreting the text of the Book of Deuteronomy line by line. New learners are always welcome.
An automobile accident and its aftermath set a young girl on a twenty-year journey that resulted in her recently published memoir, Seven Springs (Shanti Arts). Join Ellen as she reads excerpts from her memoir on themes of study, brokenness, and repair; and facilitates discussion about healing, writing, and faith.
Participants study as a small group to become kabbalat mitzvah together at Beth Emet. Please contact Marci Dickman, Director of Lifelong Education, for additional information.
Hand in Hand builds partnership and equality between Jewish and Arab Israeli citizens through a growing network of integrated Jewish-Arab schools and communities throughout the country. It impacts over 10,000 people every day, including 2,000 students in seven public schools from Jerusalem to the Galilee. The panel includes moderator Noa Yammer, International Engagement and Communication leader at Hand in Hand, and panelists representing program alumni from Palestinian and Jewish Israel.
As uncertain and unsettling as these times may be, they are not unprecedented — we have encountered them before and we prevailed. Conversation on the significance of faith communities in American public life during these troubling times will be moderated by our own Rabbi Andrea London and Reverend David J. Wood, Senior Minister at Glencoe Union Church.
Explore your spirituality or connection to the mystery or the divine in the world. We will use the prayerbook, poetry, and ourselves as our texts, aiming to deepen our connections and discern meaningful paths in our daily lives. Our tools will include mindfulness practices, journaling, questioning, and conversation. Doubting God’s existence? Come explore.
Elan and Naamah will reflect on their shared life journeys as an Israeli and an American who met 45 years ago: what Israel and American Jewry were like when they met; how each saw the other then; changes over the decades; their respective roles and activities; and the progress and collaboration of Conservative and Reform Judaism in Israel on issues of mutual concern. Two breakout sessions follow. Naamah will discuss the renaissance and challenges of Jewish life in Israel through her work as a rabbi and the dean of Hebrew Union College. Elan will focus on issues of Jewish peoplehood, Israel-Diaspora relations, and his work teaching Israelis about American Jewry.
Elan and Naamah will reflect on their shared life journeys as an Israeli and an American who met 45 years ago: what Israel and American Jewry were like when they met; how each saw the other then; changes over the decades; their respective roles and activities; and the progress and collaboration of Conservative and Reform Judaism in Israel on issues of mutual concern. Two breakout sessions follow. Naamah will discuss the renaissance and challenges of Jewish life in Israel through her work as a rabbi and the dean of Hebrew Union College. Elan will focus on issues of Jewish peoplehood, Israel-Diaspora relations, and his work teaching Israelis about American Jewry.
Learn about the origins and development of Jewish communities in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic as compared to other Caribbean Jewish populations. Learn about the Jewish settlement in Sosúa, Dominican Republic from fictional and archival materials of the original settlers, their descendants, and from historians.
This organization of Israelis and Palestinians — with active members in the U.S. and Europe — seeks a truly negotiated resolution of the Conflict for a just and lasting peace for Israel and Palestine within their own communities; it provides programs to reduce hate, polarization, and racism. We will hear about issues for a two-state solution and growing up in Gaza.
A continuing lecture-discussion class on contemporary public issues of interest to Jews as citizens. Special attention will be given to the policy and political issues facing the Biden administration.
Current policy and political decisions are often influenced by events from earlier historical periods. We will explore the conflict between morality and self-interest as the basis for American foreign policy from the 1820s to American entry in World War I, with comments about the 2021 U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.
A briefing by an Israeli diplomat to give us clarity about positions of the Israeli government, and, for most of the session, an opportunity to ask questions and provide information to Israel about our concerns.
The Center that Rabbi Resnicoff directs includes as a focus combatting the scourge of antisemitism — Jewish college faculty and students too often face intimidation and harassment for being pro-Israel or sometimes just for being Jewish. This program will examine the challenges faced and available resources.
A continuing lecture-discussion class on contemporary public issues of interest to Jews as citizens. Special attention will be given to the policy and political issues facing the Biden administration.
Panelists from three major organizations — J Street, Partners for Progressive Israel, and AIPAC — will discuss significant current events in Israel.
with Yossi Kuperwasser, a director of the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center and a Brigadier General in the IDF Reserves.
For learners with no or limited Hebrew language background. Master the Hebrew alphabet to read and understand Hebrew words and phrases in the prayer book and modern usage; connect Hebrew language with Jewish life, ritual, tradition, and Israel. Individual tutoring also available — please contact Marci Dickman, Director of Lifelong Education.
For learners seeking more meaningful participation at services. Improve Hebrew reading fluency while exploring the Shabbat morning worship service and its individual prayers. Learn key Hebrew prayer vocabulary and basic elements of Hebrew grammar.
For learners able to sound out and print Hebrew words. Explore the grammar and vocabulary of modern Hebrew through a variety of reading, writing, and speaking activities.