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Lifelong learning is at the core of Beth Emet values. Beth Emet is a diverse community of individuals with different viewpoints, backgrounds, and a broad range of Jewish learning experiences. The Beth Emet Adult Education Program offers exciting possibilities for meeting new people, exchanging ideas, and embracing Jewish history, ritual, and culture. Our classes are taught by experienced teachers and lay leaders from Beth Emet and the larger Jewish community. Offerings range from one-time events to yearlong classes.


Classes are listed and described chronologically. Everyone is welcome to listen, learn, contribute, and share new insights with other members of the Beth Emet community. Helene Rosenberg, Adult Education Committee Chair
Barbara Berngard, Reva Denlow, Nancy Fink, Douglas Hoffman, Barbara Linn, Jesse Rosenberg, and Barbara Schoenfield, Committee Member


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Courses
Please choose class(es) below.  You can hover over any class name to see a full description.
Courses

There are many ways to interpret Torah and its nuances of meaning that are often overlooked. We will continue our learning from last year, reading and interpreting the text of the Book of Deuteronomy line by line. New learners are always welcome.
Participants study as a small group to become kabbalat mitzvah together at Beth Emet. Please contact Marci Dickman, Director of Lifelong Education, for additional information.
An in-depth look at some of the debacles during the Jewish people’s trek through the desert, including the stories of the Golden Calf, the Spies, and the Korach Mutiny. We will look at the narratives, text, philosophical issues, what they might say to us today, and compare to the way they were presented in the movie, The Ten Commandments.
Music is central to the Abayudaya, a Jewish community in eastern Uganda, and unites the different synagogues there as it allows them to express their unique voices. Musicologist Amanda Ruppenthal Stein, Ph.D. will offer us a glimpse of the importance of music in ritual and daily life for this flourishing part of klal Yisrael. She will share studio and field recordings, including Psalm singing in Luganda, the Bantu language spoken in the African Great Lakes region; it is the core repertoire of the Abayudaya liturgy. Amanda Ruppenthal Stein, Ph.D. is lecturer in music at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI and at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is a recent graduate of the Bienen School of Music at Northwestern University, where she was also the Crown Graduate Fellow of the Crown Family Center for Jewish and Israel Studies. In 2019, Amanda traveled twice to Uganda to conduct fieldwork in collaboration with a solidarity mission and recording project of the Cantors Assembly, celebrating 100 Years of the Abayudaya Jewish community in Uganda.
Panelists from three major organizations — J Street, Partners for Progressive Israel, and Standiwthus— will discuss significant current events in Israel.
We will explore different aspects of the relationship between religion and literature in contemporary novels and poetry, including rewritings of biblical stories, portrayals of religious life, and characters wrestling with religious ideas and values. Most examples will be focused on Judaism and Jews, though some may be drawn from other faith traditions.
with Yossi Kuperwasser, a director of the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center and a Brigadier General in the IDF Reserves.
A briefing by an Israeli diplomat to give us clarity about positions of the Israeli government, and, for most of the session, an opportunity to ask questions and provide information to Israel about our concerns.
Courses

There are many ways to interpret Torah and its nuances of meaning that are often overlooked. We will continue our learning from last year, reading and interpreting the text of the Book of Deuteronomy line by line. New learners are always welcome.
An in-depth look at some of the debacles during the Jewish people’s trek through the desert, including the stories of the Golden Calf, the Spies, and the Korach Mutiny. We will look at the narratives, text, philosophical issues, what they might say to us today, and compare to the way they were presented in the movie, The Ten Commandments.
Music is central to the Abayudaya, a Jewish community in eastern Uganda, and unites the different synagogues there as it allows them to express their unique voices. Musicologist Amanda Ruppenthal Stein, Ph.D. will offer us a glimpse of the importance of music in ritual and daily life for this flourishing part of klal Yisrael. She will share studio and field recordings, including Psalm singing in Luganda, the Bantu language spoken in the African Great Lakes region; it is the core repertoire of the Abayudaya liturgy. Amanda Ruppenthal Stein, Ph.D. is lecturer in music at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI and at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is a recent graduate of the Bienen School of Music at Northwestern University, where she was also the Crown Graduate Fellow of the Crown Family Center for Jewish and Israel Studies. In 2019, Amanda traveled twice to Uganda to conduct fieldwork in collaboration with a solidarity mission and recording project of the Cantors Assembly, celebrating 100 Years of the Abayudaya Jewish community in Uganda.
Panelists from three major organizations — J Street, Partners for Progressive Israel, and Standwithus— will discuss significant current events in Israel.
with Yossi Kuperwasser, a director of the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center and a Brigadier General in the IDF Reserves.
We will explore different aspects of the relationship between religion and literature in contemporary novels and poetry, including rewritings of biblical stories, portrayals of religious life, and characters wrestling with religious ideas and values. Most examples will be focused on Judaism and Jews, though some may be drawn from other faith traditions.
A briefing by an Israeli diplomat to give us clarity about positions of the Israeli government, and, for most of the session, an opportunity to ask questions and provide information to Israel about our concerns.